“One of the best small magazines in the country.”
Tom Paulin

What is OP?

What is Oxford Poetry?

Oxford Poetry is over 100 years old. It is probably the oldest dedicated poetry magazine in the world today. The magazine was started in 1910 by Oxford undergraduates and published by Basil Blackwell. Previous editors have included Aldous Huxley, Siegfried Sassoon, W.H. Auden, Louis MacNeice, Kingsley Amis, Geoffrey Hill, John Fuller, John Lanchester and Robert Macfarlane. In the 1980s, Mick Imlah, Nicholas Jenkins and Bernard O'Donoghue revived it as a more outward-looking journal – no longer restricted to publishing student poetry but maintaining a connection with the university.

The list of contributors throughout its history is as impressive as it is diverse. In recent years, readers would have come across poems by Seamus Heaney, Andrew Motion, Mario Petrucci, Wendy Cope, George Szirtes, Carol Ann Duffy, David Constantine and Glyn Maxwell. Read about how to submit work or subscribe.

Poetry Press from The Page

"It is wonderful for criticism to be generous to its readers, but is it best for lyric poetry?”" Alibhe Darcy • B O D Y

"Szymborska, on the other hand, loathed the attention thrust upon her. She didn’t like talking about herself or her work, and moreover, as Janusz R. Kowalczyk puts it, “Szymborska did not enjoy ostentation or celebrations—being declared the Nobel laureate was considered ‘the Stockholm tragedy’ by her friends, as it forced her to give more interviews in a month than she had faced in her life.”" Jonathan Russell Clark • Lit Hub

"It is also Aeschylus that forms the link to Balmer’s second book, The Paths of Survival, a larger, less personal enterprise – “larger” in that it covers more than 2,000 years in the history of Aeschylus’s lost play, Myrmidons. Very little of Aeschylus survives at all and only tiny fragments of Myrmidons remain as preserved, quoted or referred to over time. In this sense it represents all lost texts, all destructions by fire, fury, theft, or neglect." George Szirtes • New Statesman

"Plath’s early poetry, the stuff she wrote at Smith and had published in Harper’s, was awful. Written under the burdensome influence of Dylan Thomas, it was, as Thomas could occasionally be, showy and aimless. (“Go get the goodly squab in gold-lobed corn / And pluck the droll flecked quail where thick they lie.”)" Anwen Crawford • New Yorker


Oxford Poetry is published twice a year, and currently edited by Nancy Campbell, Mary Jean Chan and Theophilus Kwek.

© Oxford Poetry 2017