“One of the best small magazines in the country.”
Tom Paulin

What is OP?

What is Oxford Poetry?

Oxford Poetry is over 100 years old. It is probably the oldest dedicated poetry magazine in the world today. The magazine was started in 1910 by Oxford undergraduates and published by Basil Blackwell. Previous editors have included Aldous Huxley, Siegfried Sassoon, W.H. Auden, Louis MacNeice, Kingsley Amis, Geoffrey Hill, John Fuller, John Lanchester and Robert Macfarlane. In the 1980s, Mick Imlah, Nicholas Jenkins and Bernard O'Donoghue revived it as a more outward-looking journal – no longer restricted to publishing student poetry but maintaining a connection with the university.

The list of contributors throughout its history is as impressive as it is diverse. In recent years, readers would have come across poems by Seamus Heaney, Andrew Motion, Mario Petrucci, Wendy Cope, George Szirtes, Carol Ann Duffy, David Constantine and Glyn Maxwell. Read about how to submit work or subscribe.

Poetry Press from The Page

"Churchyard was no less keen on the use of words as weapons. Woodcock finds that his “dominant character” is “Churchyard the complainant or petitioner”, adopted right from his first publication, Davy Dycars Dreame (1551). Emulating Langland and Skelton, he sets out the social and economic grievances of the common man (in this case a “dyker”, a ditcher or labourer) in a broadside poem which provoked a print controversy comprising sixteen further works by various authors." Helen Hackett TLS

"Well the sonnet is an obsessional form. Its intellectual skeleton is opposition, its form is imbalance, the impatient compression of its concluding section (whether six, four, three or two lines) always leaving a question only temporarily settled, so the writer is invited or compelled to return to the charge, as in a domestic argument: “ … And another thing”. Eilean Ni Chuilleanain DRB

"The curse poem is a well-known Irish literary genre, especially in the Gaelic tradition Hartnett inherited through his Kerry-born grandmother, one of the last native Irish speakers in west Limerick." Frank McNally Irish Times

"After the discovery of a cache of Boswell manuscripts in 1929, Woolf’s diary records her feelings about the find: “Think! There are 18 volumes of Boswell’s diaries now to be published. With any luck I shall live to read them. I feel as if some dead person were said to be living after all”." Rachel Bowlby TLS


Oxford Poetry is published twice a year, and currently edited by Nancy Campbell, Mary Jean Chan and Theophilus Kwek.

© Oxford Poetry 2017